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Sites in Mali, Libya, and Uzbekistan Added to UNESCO Endangered List

By Zac Thompson

Posted on 07/14/2016, 11:00 PM

An ancient village of mud houses in Mali has been added to the UNESCO World Heritage list of endangered sites. Instability from Islamist militants in the West African country has kept preservationists from taking necessary measures to protect the village, known as the Old Towns of Djenné—a grouping of nearly 2,000 mud homes that have been inhabited since 250 BC. Other additions to the enda...

Pauline Frommer's Top (Travel) Resolutions for the Coming Year

By Pauline Frommer

Posted on 12/17/2015, 4:45 PM

It’s that time of year and let’s be real, those three inches padding my waistline aren’t coming off anytime soon. Instead of doing the usual “lose 10 pounds” resolution, my top 7 promises to myself are going to revolve around travel. 1. To travel somewhere at the last minute. As a working parent, too much of my life is scheduled long in advance. This year, I hope to scoop up the kids...

Congrats, Philly, the US's First World Heritage City

By Jason Cochran

Posted on 11/12/2015, 8:00 PM

Congratulations to Philadelphia, which has just become the first American city to earn the distinction of World Heritage City. Like World Heritage Sites, which are named by UNESCO, Cities are deemed to be worth protecting for their value and position in world history. In Philadelphia's case, it was named for its role in promoting democracy. "The universal principles of freedom and demo...

War is Brewing Over the Queen Mary: Petition Alleging Mismanagement is Launched

By Jason Cochran

Posted on 07/14/2015, 1:00 AM

The condition of the Third Class Dining Room, now used as chair storage, courtesy of RMS Queen Mary Facebook Community The RMS Queen Mary is a rare artifact from the golden era of transoceanic liner travel. It was launched in 1936, quickly set speed records, and for more than three decades, it crisscrossed the Atlantic Ocean, delivering passengers to the United States and the United K...

The Alamo in San Antonio Wins UNESCO Status, And It Couldn't Come at a More Embarrassing Time

By Jason Cochran

Posted on 07/05/2015, 8:45 PM

The Alamo in San Antonio, Texas, has just been inscribed with one of the most prestigious designations in international tourism: It and the four other San Antonio Missions now comprise a UNESCO World Heritage Site. It's only the 23rd such site in the United States and the first for Texas. The Alamo, if you don't remember your grammar school history, was the place where American se...

This Haunting Record of Georgia's Forgotten Country Churches Could Inspire an Unforgettable Road Trip

By Jason Cochran

Posted on 05/12/2015, 7:30 PM

Friendship Baptist, cir. 1831, Wilkes County, Georgia, from HRCGA.org Now and then, we discover a homegrown website that celebrates a topic we'd never thought about much before, and before we know it, we're plotting a new trip. That's the effect HRCGA.org had. It stands for Historic Rural Churches of Georgia, and it's an elegant compendium of the most charming, the most quaint, th...

Point/Counterpoint: Pauline Frommer Gives Her Impressions of Colonial Williamsburg

By Pauline Frommer

Posted on 12/04/2014, 10:00 PM

I won’t lie: I was dragged, kicking and wailing, to Colonial Williamsburg. I thought the idea of spending Thanksgiving at the famed “living history museum” was a goofy one, and the rolling of my teenage daughter’s eyes when the plan, created by my father, was announced only confirmed that this was going to be a familial disaster. I expected a weekend of candle making and rock candy suckin...

Ellis Island's Haunting Hospital Ward Now Open

By Jason Cochran

Posted on 10/14/2014, 2:45 PM

After years of begging from Americana buffs and urban explorers, the spooky and historically crucial Hospital Complex of New York harbor's Ellis Island is now open for guided tours after years of decay and abandonment. Most people identify Ellis Island with its regal Main Building, through which some 12 million immigrants passed in the six decades it served as New York City's principa...

Munching Your Way Through Melbourne History: The Queen Victoria Market

By Pauline Frommer

Posted on 10/09/2014, 2:15 AM

Sydney, The Reef and the Rock: those are the three “constellations” that shine most brightly in Australia’s tourism firmament. But there’s a good argument to be made that Australia’s second city, Melbourne—which at one time, due to an 1850’s gold rush, was the continent’s most celebrated metropolis—shouldn’t be overlooked. Built far later than Sydney (the mid-1800’s rather than the 1700’s...

Gettysburg is booked for its 150th anniversary, but there are ways

By Jason Cochran

Posted on 05/07/2013, 1:30 AM

The hotels around Gettysburg, PA, are already jammed for the massive 150th commemoration of the seminal Civil War battle of 1863. There will be a huge re-enactment on July 4 to 7, and tparticipants snapped up lodging months ago, meaning that even a room in the Super 8 can hit you for $250 a night. You can still participate in the once-in-a-lifetime re-creation, though. The city has set up ...

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