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The Quadrilatero is the gastronome epicenter of Bologna, where you can snack your way through a number of venerable food shops on a warren of lanes behind Piazza Maggiore. At Tamburi, one of Italy’s most lavish food shops, Via Caprarie 1 (tamburini.com; (tel) 051-232-226), a buffet selection of pastas, meats and fish, soups and salads, vegetables, and sweets is accompanied by 200 wines by the glass, and La Baita, Via Pescherie Vecchie 3A ((tel) 051-223-940), lets you choose from a dizzying selection of hams and cheeses and enjoy them in a busy mezzanine dining room. Eataly (Via degli Orefici 19; www.eataly.it;(tel) 051-095-2820), Bologna’s outpost of the shop that’s taken New York and other cities by storm, sells books as well as cheese, hams, and other gourmet products and wine, consumed picnic-style at indoor and outdoor tables. Osteria del Sole, Vicolo Ranocchi 1D (osteriadelsole.it; (tel) 348-225-6887; closed Sun) is an invitingly rundown room with a bring-your-own policy—as in food; they supply the wine for 2€ a glass. Good places to shop for the accompanying meal are the enticing Salumeria Simoni at Via Drapperie 5/2A ((tel) salumeriasimoni.it; (tel) 051-231-880) and Enoteca Italiana, Via Marsala 2/B (www.enotecaitaliana.it; (tel) 051-235-989); you might want to add some bread and a pastry from Atti, Via Caprarie 7 (www.paoloatti.com; (tel) 051-220425). Bologna’s central food market, Mercato delle Erbe, is a few blocks west of this district at Via Ugo Bassi 25 (www.mercatodelleerbe.it); it’s open Monday to Wednesday 7am to 1:15pm and 5:30 to 7:30pm, Thursday and Saturday 7am to 1:15pm, and Friday 7am to 1:15pm and 4:30 to 7:30pm.

A favorite Bologna post-prandial attraction is Gelatauro, Via San Vitale 98 (www.gelatauro.com; (tel) 051-230049; Mon 9am–8pm, Tues–Thurs 8:30am–11pm, Fri–Sat 8:30am–midnight, Sun 9:30am–11pm), run by three brothers and known for its organic gelato, including one divine concoction made from Sicilian oranges.

 

Maybe it’s not too surprising that Bologna also has many famous chocolatiers. Majani, Via de’ Carbonesi 5 ((tel) 051-234302), claims to be Italy’s oldest sweets shop, having made and sold confections since 1796. Roccati, Via Clavature 17A (www.roccaticioccolato.com; (tel) 051-261-964)is run by a husband-and-wife team that makes the gianduja (hazelnut andcognac-filledchocolate) their ancestors once concocted for the princes of Savoy. 

Note: This information was accurate when it was published, but can change without notice. Please be sure to confirm all rates and details directly with the companies in question before planning your trip.