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To a dazzling degree, London attractions cater to the family market. The kingly treatment starts, at many places, with the so-named Family Ticket, which grants a low price for parents and kids entering together, and continues with a huge array of activity trails, kid-focused exhibits, activities, and even costumes to try on. Weekends are prime time for the availability of family activities, but always ask what's available.

For any length of stay, you can rent baby equipment from Chelsea Baby Hire (www.chelseababyhire.com; [tel] 07802/846-742). Babysitting: Top Notch Nannies (www.topnotchnannies.co.uk; [tel] 020/7881-0893, 020/7824-8209) normally brokers child-minders—usually Australians or Eastern Europeans—to wealthy London families, but it also runs a sideline, Brilliant Babysitters, which starts with a £12 booking fee (£15 last-minute), then £10–£15 an hour.

If you are a divorced parent with joint custody of your children, bring proof that you are entitled to take your kids out of the country.

Some resources for family-specific travel tips include the Family Travel Network (www.familytravelnetwork.com), online since 1995. Travel with Your Kids (www.travelwithyourkids.com) specializes in tips for international travel, and it also maintains a section just about London’s finds. The Family Travel Files (www.thefamilytravelfiles.com) rounds up tour operators and packagers geared to families, but its suggestions aren’t always the most economical or efficient. Time Out (www.timeout.com/london) also includes a section on kids’ activities.

When it comes to baby supplies, pacifiers are called “dummies,” diapers are “nappies,” a crib is a “cot,” and Band-Aids are “plasters.”

 

Note: This information was accurate when it was published, but can change without notice. Please be sure to confirm all rates and details directly with the companies in question before planning your trip.