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  • Jemaa el Fna (Marrakech): Marrakech's famed square is the setting for an incredible spectacle that begins in the morning with snake charmers, West African Gnaoua musicians, and nakkachat, veiled women ready to tattoo any bare piece of flesh with their henna-based designs. Come late afternoon, they are joined by all manner of performers -- acrobats, dancers, musicians, and storytellers called halkas -- and the square's heart converts to the country's largest open-air restaurant. More than 100 food carts offer traditional dishes such as couscous and tagine, along with specialties such as boiled escargot and roasted sheep's head. Surrounding the "show" is a circle of stalls selling freshly squeezed orange juice and dried fruit and nuts. It all adds up to a visual extravaganza, and each "performer" is ready and willing -- upon payment of a few dirham -- to be photographed.
  • Chouwara Tannery (Fes): The largest and busiest of Fes el Bali's traditional tanneries, Chouwara is a scene straight out of medieval times. The skins of camels, cows, goats, and sheep are stretched, cured in a concoction that includes cow urine and pigeon droppings, and laid out to dry. Workers in shorts then stomp around in various earthen pits, where the skins are dyed in natural colors taken from indigo (blue), mint (green), poppy (red), and turmeric (yellow). It makes for a stunning picture from the viewpoints above -- strategically placed within the various leather shops -- though the rancid smell emanating from the cocktail of chemicals certainly makes you earn it.
  • Camel Caravans in the Sand: Whether in the soft glow of the morning light or silhouetted against the often rapidly setting sun, the image of trekking camels is the stuff of postcards and can be captured in Morocco's sand seas, Erg Chebbi and Erg Chigaga. Here you'll find men (dressed in the flowing blue caftans and robes of the famed Tuareg nomads) walking alongside trains of loping one-humped dromedaries into the seemingly never-ending dunes of Saharan sands.
  • Jardin Majorelle (Marrakech): Within this popular city sight is the former studio of the original owner, artist Jacques Majorelle, and its brilliant cobalt-blue exterior contrasts strikingly with the surrounding flora of this now botanical garden. Jardin Majorelle's most recent owner was the very colorful and fashionable Frenchman, Yves Saint Laurent, who ensured the small building regularly received a fresh lick of color, sometimes simply described as "Majorelle blue" because of its combination of brightness and depth. The garden maintains its standing as a popular visual for Moroccan postcards and coffee table-style books.
  • The Colored Doors of the Medina: Most architectural beauty within Morocco's medinas is to be found behind the doors of its houses, maisons d'hôte, medersas, and mosques. Often overlooked, however, are the doors themselves. The only obvious external feature distinguishing one establishment from the other, the doors of the medina are often a very visual reflection of the status of the family that lives behind it. They can range from simple and practical -- often painted in bright blues, greens, reds, or whites -- to castlelike creations complete with a brass knocker and mosaic archway. Those in the medinas of Asilah, Chefchaouen, Essaouira, and Fes, along with Rabat's kasbah, are particularly photogenic.
  • A Rainbow of Babouches: Morocco's traditional slipper is the leather babouche, which is worn by men and women of all ages and backgrounds. Styles range from pointed to rounded toe in colors covering the whole spectrum of the rainbow. Walk through any market or souk in the country, and you're bound to find the local babouche quarter, where literally hundreds of babouches are displayed from floor to ceiling. Politely ask the shopkeeper if you can photograph his collection, and you may end up with a pair for yourself. Marrakech's Souk Smata and Meknes's Souk es Sebbat are just two market areas devoted to this popular footwear.
  • Spice Cones: Spices are an everyday ingredient in the cuisine of Morocco and can be purchased from establishments ranging from small medina stalls to large nationwide supermarket chains. At the front of most spice stalls you'll see the various spices displayed in tall, cone-shape mounds within brass or steel vats. The vibrant color of these mounds of henna (green), chili (orange), paprika (red), and turmeric (yellow) are easy subjects for an image that sums up the exotic sights and smells of the country's medinas.
  • Souk des Teinturiers (Marrakech): Marrakech's dyers' souk is one of the most photogenic -- and photographed -- areas of the city's medina, and with good reason. While jellabah-wearing shopkeepers sit outside their shops, the top of your camera's frame is filled with overhanging fabric and wool, still wet from being recently dyed in bright blues, oranges, reds, and yellows. The colorful subject matter is better some days than others, but give yourself a few consecutive days, and you'll more than likely be able to find your perfect picture.
  • Seffarine Square (Fes): This busy square, bordering one side of the spiritual Kairouine Mosque, is home to the ancient city's brass and copper workshops. Although the noise generated by the constant banging and clanging can't be captured on film, there's still plenty of scope for great images. Coppersmiths sit cross-legged while shaping everything from small decorative plates to huge cauldrons, and are generally receptive to camera-wielding visitors requesting a photo or two.
  • Jellabahs & Donkeys: A jellabah (a traditional robe with a pointed hood) is still worn throughout the country by both sexes and all ages, and many Moroccans still transport their goods, and themselves, by donkey. An everyday visual, this combination makes for a fascinating picture, especially in the larger towns and cities where the contrast of traditional and modern can be captured as the four-legged subjects plod by a KFC or McDonald's.
  • Note: This information was accurate when it was published, but can change without notice. Please be sure to confirm all rates and details directly with the companies in question before planning your trip.