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Norway has been in the vanguard of providing services for people with disabilities. In general, trains, airlines, ferries, department stores, and malls are accessible. For information about wheelchair access, ferry and air travel, parking, and other matters, contact the appropriate tourist board. The Norwegian Association of the Disabled, Schweigaardsgt #12, 9217 Grønland, 0185 Oslo (tel. 24-10-24-00; www.nhf.no), also provides useful information.

If you're flying around Norway or Europe in general, the airline can help with such things as reserving seats with enough space, while ground staff can help you on and off planes; but you must arrange for this assistance in advance through the airline.

Many travel agencies offer customized tours and itineraries for travelers with disabilities. Flying Wheels Travel (tel. 507/451-5005; www.flyingwheelstravel.com) offers escorted tours and cruises that emphasize sports, and private tours in minivans with lifts. Access-Able Travel Source (www.access-able.com) offers extensive access information and advice for traveling around the world with disabilities. Accessible Journeys (tel. 800/846-4537 or 610/521-0339; www.disabilitytravel.com) caters specifically to slow walkers and wheelchair travelers and their families and friends.

Organizations that offer assistance to travelers with disabilities include MossRehab (tel. 800/CALL-MOSS; www.mossresourcenet.org), which provides a library of accessible-travel resources online; SATH (Society for Accessible Travel and Hospitality; tel. 212/447-7284; www.sath.org; annual membership fees: $45 adults, $30 seniors and students), which offers a wealth of travel resources for all types of disabilities and informed recommendations on destinations, access guides, travel agents, tour operators, vehicle rentals, and companion services; and the American Foundation for the Blind (AFB; tel. 800/232-5463; www.afb.org), a referral resource for the blind or visually impaired that includes information on traveling with Seeing Eye dogs.

For more information specifically targeted to travelers with disabilities, the community website iCan (www.icanonline.net) has destination guides and several regular columns on accessible travel. Also check out the quarterly magazine Emerging Horizons (www.emerginghorizons.com) and Open World Magazine, published by SATH.

For British Travelers -- The Royal Association for Disability and Rehabilitation (RADAR), Unit 12, City Forum, 250 City Rd., London EC1V 8AF (tel. 020/7250-3222; www.radar.org.uk), publishes three holiday "fact packs." The first provides general information, including tips for planning and booking a holiday, obtaining insurance, and handling finances; the second outlines transportation available when going abroad and equipment for rent; and the third deals with specialized accommodations. Another good resource is Holiday Care Service, Seventh Floor, Sunley House, 4 Bedford Park, Croydon, Surrey CR0 2AP (tel. 0845/124-9971; www.holidaycare.org.uk), a national charity advising on accessible accommodations for seniors and persons with disabilities. Annual membership is £37.

Note: This information was accurate when it was published, but can change without notice. Please be sure to confirm all rates and details directly with the companies in question before planning your trip.