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South Coast

Choices are limited in this sparsely populated region, and many travelers stock up on groceries in Borgarnes. The Vegamót service station (tel. 435-6690; daily to 9pm), at the southern junction of Route 54 and Route 56, is a common fast-food pit-stop. Between Vegamót and Búðir, the best dinner option is the buffet at Guesthouse Langaholt, Route 54, at Garðar Farm, east of Búðavík Bay (tel. 435-6789; 4,200–7,900kr; May–Sept 7–9pm), with a large selection of fish dishes based on whatever is fresh from the local fishermen; be sure to call ahead, especially in May or September.

The most gourmet option by far is Hótel Búðir, off Route 574, near the southern junction of Route 574 and Route 54 (tel. 435-6700; reservations recommended; main courses 5,090kr–8,900kr; Mar–Oct daily 6–10pm, Nov–Feb Fri–Sun 6–10pm), with a pared-down, seasonal menu strong on fresh, local ingredients, such as lamb with a parsley root-birch purée or monkfish with barley, fennel, and shellfish sauce. On the main road into Arnarstapi, Arnarbær (tel. 435-6783;  main courses 1,800kr–3,800kr; daily 10am–10pm) is a reliable and unpretentious choice, with lamb and seafood specials as well as the usual burgers. In Hellnar, Hotel Hellnar (tel. 435-6820; main courses 3,700–5,200kr; Sept–May daily 7–9pm) uses mostly organic ingredients in traditional dishes, while Fjöruhúsið (tel. 435-6844; light fare 900kr–2,800kr; May 15–Sept 15 daily 10am–10pm) is a tiny seaside cafe with limited seating, a sublime atmosphere, and a famed fish soup.

North Coast

The north coast has a greater array of dining options to choose from, but nothing worth planning your trip around -- just the usual array of hotel restaurants (good quality, but predictable and unatmospheric), the village restaurant-bar (burgers and pizzas, with a couple of fish and lamb plates), and fast food at the gas station.

In Hellissandur, the Hótel Hellissandur, Klettsbúð 7 (tel. 430-8600;reservations recommended; main courses 3,600–5,400kr; mid-May to mid-Sept daily 7:30am–9pm), has the best of the Icelandic mainstays such as fresh fish or lamb soup, a vegetarian option, and reasonable prices.

In Grundarfjörður, Hótel Framnes, Nesvegur 8 (tel. 438-6893; main courses 3,200kr–4,200kr; mid-May to Sept daily 7–10pm), is the preferred choice, with a small menu; call in advance, especially in May or September. Kaffi 59 on Route 54 (tel. 438-6446; main courses 1,250kr–3,100kr; Mon–Thurs 10am–10pm, Fri 9am–1am, Sat 11am–1am, Sun 11am–10pm, kitchen always shuts at 10pm) is also a good option, offering bacalao (salted cod) and lamb, as well as burgers, pizza, and homemade cakes.

In Ólafsvík, Hótel Ólafsvík, Ólafsbraut 19-20 (Rte. 574) (tel. 436-1650; reservations recommended; main courses 3,200kr–5,290kr; daily noon–10pm), has a stately ambience and emphasizes fresh catches from the port next door. The new casual restaurant in town is Gilið, Grundarbraut 2, at Route 574 (tel. 436-1501; main courses 970kr-2,100kr/$16-$34/£17-£17; AE, DC, MC, V; daily 11am-9pm), with a welcoming air and a serviceable menu of burgers, pizzas, sandwiches, soups, pan-fried cod, lamb, and lasagna.

Note: This information was accurate when it was published, but can change without notice. Please be sure to confirm all rates and details directly with the companies in question before planning your trip.