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U.S. Army Museum Opening June 2020

By Zac Thompson

Posted on 08/29/2019, 9:30 PM

The United States Army has set an opening date for its new museum honoring the oldest branch of the U.S. military. The National Museum of the United States Army will begin welcoming visitors on June 4, 2020, according to a news release.  The glass-and-steel facility is currently under construction in a publicly accessible part of Virginia's Fort Belvoir, located about 30 miles south of Washingto...

New Paris Museum Chronicles Liberation from Nazis in WW2

By Zac Thompson

Posted on 08/20/2019, 10:15 PM

Sunday, August 25, marks the 75th anniversary of the Liberation of Paris from its Nazi occupiers during World War II. On the same day, a new museum will open permanently to chronicle that momentous 1944 event.  The facility's name is a mouthful: the Musée de la Libération de Paris-Musée du Général Leclerc-Musée Jean Moulin, but most English-speaking people will call it the Liberation Museum. De...

Closed for Three Years, D.C.'s Washington Monument Finally Has a Reopening Date

By Zac Thompson

Posted on 08/20/2019, 12:00 AM

The Washington Monument in America's capital will reopen to the public on Thursday, September 19, the National Park Service has announced.  The 555-foot-tall marble-and-granite obelisk on the National Mall has been closed for elevator repairs since 2016. Before that, visitors were barred from entering the monument for more than two years starting in 2011, when an earthquake rattled the structure....

Liquor and Spirits: San Diego to Get a Cemetery Speakeasy

By Zac Thompson

Posted on 08/19/2019, 12:00 AM

San Diego's El Campo Santo cemetery was established in the city's historic Old Town in 1849, and according to ghost hunters, the spirits residing there have been riled up almost ever since. A streetcar line was installed right through the middle of the burial site in the late 19th century, disturbing the eternal rest of those interred there (small brass markers in the street indicate gravesites ...

You Can Now Stay at a French Castle That Hosted Mozart and Voltaire

By Zac Thompson

Posted on 06/04/2019, 12:00 PM

Some of the biggest stars in 18th-century European culture—including Mozart as well as Age of Enlightenment thinkers Voltaire, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, and Denis Diderot—spent time at the estate of Baron Jacques Pineau de Viennay in the castle-packed Loire Valley southwest of Paris.  Now you can stay there, too.  Following a meticulous renovation, the baron's summer residence has been reopened as ...

See Cool Gadgets and Test Your Espionage Skills at D.C.’s New Spy Museum

By Candyce H. Stapen

Posted on 05/17/2019, 12:00 AM

The new and improved International Spy Museum, which opened May 12 in Washington, D.C., claims to house “the world’s largest public display of authentic spy tools and gadgets.” Among the clever gizmos lining the walls: a shoe with a hidden microphone, a silver dollar concealing a tiny suicide syringe, a KGB lipstick pistol, and a bunch of other contraptions worthy of James Bond or at least Maxw...

Learn About NYC's LGBTQ History—and Drink Beer!—on This New Walking Tour

By Zac Thompson

Posted on 05/09/2019, 8:00 AM

This summer marks the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall rebellion of June 1969, when gay and transgender bargoers resisted a police raid on the Stonewall Inn of New York City's Greenwich Village. Rioting lasted for days and launched the modern movement for LGBTQ rights.  Just in time for the big milestone, New York City Urban Adventures—part of a network of locally operated tour agencies under In...

Muslim History Tour Tells Untold Chapter of New York City's Past—and Present

By Zac Thompson

Posted on 04/25/2019, 12:00 PM

The gym where I work out (when I’m feeling up to it and can’t find anything good on Netflix) is housed in a building that stands where there used to be a mosque founded by Yemeni immigrants and frequented by jazz musicians. The Apollo Theater is just about a block east on 125th St. in Harlem, where I live. Back in the 1940s and ‘50s, performers at that legendary Upper Manhattan venue are said t...

Arthur Frommer: Are We Hypocrites to Visit the Statue of Liberty?

By Arthur Frommer

Posted on 04/24/2019, 9:00 AM

On an island in the waters off New York, is a giant statue inscribed with the immortal words of Emma Lazarus: “Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free…”   It—the Statue of Liberty—is visited each year by three million American tourists who often weep when they read those words.   In the months ahead, those same tourists, by their political inaction, will h...

Sazerac Cocktail Museum to Open in New Orleans

By Jay Gentile

Posted on 02/13/2019, 6:00 AM

Anyone who’s been to New Orleans knows that drinking is a big deal in the Big Easy. So it’s perhaps no surprise that the city that claims to have invented the cocktail will soon be home to a new experience dedicated to the official local drink, the Sazerac.   For those who’ve never tasted one, the Sazerac is one of America’s longest-running cocktails: a mix of cognac, bourbon, or rye whiskey...

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