advertisement

You Can Now Stay at a French Castle That Hosted Mozart and Voltaire

By Zac Thompson

Posted on 06/04/2019, 12:00 PM

Some of the biggest stars in 18th-century European culture—including Mozart as well as Age of Enlightenment thinkers Voltaire, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, and Denis Diderot—spent time at the estate of Baron Jacques Pineau de Viennay in the castle-packed Loire Valley southwest of Paris.  Now you can stay there, too.  Following a meticulous renovation, the baron's summer residence has been reopened as ...

See Cool Gadgets and Test Your Espionage Skills at D.C.’s New Spy Museum

By Candyce H. Stapen

Posted on 05/17/2019, 12:00 AM

The new and improved International Spy Museum, which opened May 12 in Washington, D.C., claims to house “the world’s largest public display of authentic spy tools and gadgets.” Among the clever gizmos lining the walls: a shoe with a hidden microphone, a silver dollar concealing a tiny suicide syringe, a KGB lipstick pistol, and a bunch of other contraptions worthy of James Bond or at least Maxw...

Learn About NYC's LGBTQ History—and Drink Beer!—on This New Walking Tour

By Zac Thompson

Posted on 05/09/2019, 8:00 AM

This summer marks the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall rebellion of June 1969, when gay and transgender bargoers resisted a police raid on the Stonewall Inn of New York City's Greenwich Village. Rioting lasted for days and launched the modern movement for LGBTQ rights.  Just in time for the big milestone, New York City Urban Adventures—part of a network of locally operated tour agencies under In...

Muslim History Tour Tells Untold Chapter of New York City's Past—and Present

By Zac Thompson

Posted on 04/25/2019, 12:00 PM

The gym where I work out (when I’m feeling up to it and can’t find anything good on Netflix) is housed in a building that stands where there used to be a mosque founded by Yemeni immigrants and frequented by jazz musicians. The Apollo Theater is just about a block east on 125th St. in Harlem, where I live. Back in the 1940s and ‘50s, performers at that legendary Upper Manhattan venue are said t...

Arthur Frommer: Are We Hypocrites to Visit the Statue of Liberty?

By Arthur Frommer

Posted on 04/24/2019, 9:00 AM

On an island in the waters off New York, is a giant statue inscribed with the immortal words of Emma Lazarus: “Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free…”   It—the Statue of Liberty—is visited each year by three million American tourists who often weep when they read those words.   In the months ahead, those same tourists, by their political inaction, will h...

Sazerac Cocktail Museum to Open in New Orleans

By Jay Gentile

Posted on 02/13/2019, 6:00 AM

Anyone who’s been to New Orleans knows that drinking is a big deal in the Big Easy. So it’s perhaps no surprise that the city that claims to have invented the cocktail will soon be home to a new experience dedicated to the official local drink, the Sazerac.   For those who’ve never tasted one, the Sazerac is one of America’s longest-running cocktails: a mix of cognac, bourbon, or rye whiskey...

In Nevada, a School for Stolen Native American Kids Will Be a Museum

By Zac Thompson

Posted on 02/11/2019, 12:00 AM

Starting in the late 19th century, the U.S. government forced tens of thousands of Native American children to leave home and attend boarding schools with the goal of assimilating students into the dominant Euro-American culture.  While providing a basic education, the schools also often required Native attendees to do manual labor and forbade them from speaking their languages, carrying out cultu...

Rare Civil War Artifacts Debut at Philly’s Constitution Museum

By Zac Thompson

Posted on 02/08/2019, 2:00 AM

Philadelphia's National Constitution Center—chartered by Congress to "disseminate information about the U.S. Constitution on a nonpartisan basis"—is adding a new permanent exhibit recounting a crucial chapter in that document's history.  Opening May 9, "Civil War and Reconstruction: The Battle for Freedom and Equality" will use interactive multimedia and scores of historical artifacts to illustra...

Martin Luther King's Family Home Will Open to the Public

By Zac Thompson

Posted on 02/04/2019, 5:45 PM

The house in Atlanta where Martin Luther King, Jr., lived with his wife, Coretta Scott King, and their four children will soon be open for tours.  The nonprofit National Park Foundation purchased the home, located in the Vine City neighborhood, from the estate of Coretta Scott King on January 8 and promptly transferred the property to the National Park Service.  The building will become part of ...

Can the Taj Mahal Be Saved? New Measures To Preserve India's Wonder

By Zac Thompson

Posted on 01/25/2019, 2:00 PM

The Taj Mahal remains the most convincing argument that Agra, the northern Indian city where the marble mausoleum stands, was once something like a paradise. Gazing at Shah Jahan's show-stopping tribute to his deceased wife, you can believe—even amid the hordes of tourists—that Agra was renowned for its elegance and beauty during the city's Mughal Empire heyday, when longboats floated down the Yam...

Displaying entries 1 - 10 of 44 in total