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The vibrant and beautiful six counties of Ireland still under British rule are all the more fascinating for their troubled history. At their epicenter is Belfast, the capital of Northern Ireland—a curious combination of faded grandeur and forward-looking optimism. Belfast boomed in the 19th century as prosperity flowed from its vast textile and shipbuilding industries. The 20th century was not so kind to the city, which spent decades in decline, riven with political divisions and terrorism. But an entire generation has grown up since those troubled years ended in the 1990s, and with them, Belfast has forged a new identity, complete with an artsy, edgy underground.

The old Belfast is still there—both in the form of its grand old Victorian buildings in the center, and some old school, never-the-twain-shall-meet Protestant and Catholic neighborhoods in the suburbs. But new developments signal change and renewal, such as the Titanic Quarter, with its sleek new museums and modern visitor attractions. This is a lively, funky, youthful, and complicated city. Come and let it surprise you.
 

Visiting Northern Ireland: FAQ

What is Northern Ireland? It’s still part of Ireland, right?
Yes—and no. It’s a part of the island of Ireland, but not the Republic of Ireland.

I’m confused. Is it a different country or not?
Bear with us—this is complicated. Northern Ireland is part of the United Kingdom. It has been a separate entity from the rest of Ireland since 1921. If “entity” sounds a little vague, that’s because—get this—there isn’t even an official term to describe what Northern Ireland is. (Trust us, we checked). It is referred to, variously, as a country, a nation, a region, and a province. Note, however, that your mobile phone company will treat Northern Ireland as the U.K., so inform them in advance if you plan to cross the border, to avoid international roaming charges. Also, check that your travel insurance and any car-rental agreements are equally valid in Northern Ireland.

Will I need to show my passport at the border crossing?
No, because there really isn’t a border crossing. In fact, it can be hard to tell when you’ve entered Northern Ireland—except that the road signs change from miles to kilometers. Signs around the border usually show both.

What are those letters and numbers at the end of Northern Irish addresses?
They’re British-style postal codes. Postcodes are still in the process of being introduced to the Republic, but almost every address in Northern Ireland has one. This is actually a big advantage if you’re driving, as it makes GPS navigation much easier.

Does Northern Ireland use the euro?
No. The currency in Northern Ireland is the British pound (sterling). In practice, euros are accepted in some border areas, at tourist attractions and hotels; however, you may be given change in pounds. (And just try using those pounds in the rest of Ireland!) And if you’re travelling onward to Britain, be aware that Northern Irish pounds look completely different from standard ones, and many businesses won’t accept them. (They’re legally obliged to, but…well, you try arguing.)

What about the Brexit vote? Has that changed anything?
Nobody yet knows how Britain’s shock 2016 vote to leave the E.U. will affect Northern Ireland (which as part of the U.K. is obligated to exit, even though its citizens mostly voted to remain). It does seem to have affected the exchange rate somewhat—since the Brexit vote it’s averaged around 0.8 euro to the pound, which is great for travelers going in to Northern Ireland, but painful the other way. (Before that it was usually around 1.4 euro to the pound). However, nothing major will change until at least 2019. Follow the news for the latest updates.
 

Note: This information was accurate when it was published, but can change without notice. Please be sure to confirm all rates and details directly with the companies in question before planning your trip.