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  • Hiking in Rocky Mountain National Park: There's something for everyone here, from short hikes around a lovely mountain lake to the difficult 8-mile trek to the top of 14,259-foot Longs Peak. Trail heads can be accessed with the park's shuttle bus, from campgrounds, and from stops along Trail Ridge Road. However you do it, getting into the wilds is a treat in this beautiful setting.
  • Cowpunching on a Cattle Drive: To really step back into the West of the 1800s, join working cowboys on a genuine cattle drive. The Saddleback Ranch near Steamboat Springs (tel. 970/871-4697) is a working cattle ranch, where you'll become just another cowpuncher, moving stock from one pasture to another and performing other ranch duties.
  • Skiing the San Juan Hut System: Ambitious cross-country skiers who want to put a few miles behind them, as well as take in the 14,000-foot alpine peaks, love the San Juan Hut System's trail and series of shelters between Telluride and Moab, Utah. Designed for intermediate skiers, the trail can be tackled in small sections or its entirety, with overnight stays in the well-equipped huts.
  • Soaring in the Treetops: A network of 25 zip lines up to 1,400 feet long that crisscross the Animas River, Soaring Tree Top Adventures near Durango (tel. 970/769-2357) allows visitors to get a bird's-eye view of an old-growth forest, sometimes from 100 feet above the ground. The attraction is accessible only via the Durango & Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad.
  • Rafting the Arkansas River: Running the rapids on the Arkansas River is one of the best and surely most exciting ways to see some of the most beautiful landscapes in the West. 
  • Backpacking in the Maroon Bells Wilderness Area: Among the largest roadless areas in the lower 48, the Maroon Bells and Snowmass wilderness areas occupy a sizable chunk of picture-perfect real estate between Aspen and Crested Butte. The Four Pass Loop is one of the best backpacking loops in the state, typically requiring three nights in the backcountry. 
  • Hiking the Colorado Trail: For some 500 miles, this trail winds from Denver to Durango, through some of the state’s most spectacular and rugged terrain, crossing the Continental Divide, eight mountain ranges, and six wilderness areas. 

 

 

 

 

Note: This information was accurate when it was published, but can change without notice. Please be sure to confirm all rates and details directly with the companies in question before planning your trip.