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Visitor Information

In addition to the annual New Jersey Travel Guide, the state's tourism office also puts out several free specialty publications focusing on history, ecotourism, lighthouses, golf, and African-American culture and history. Contact the New Jersey Commerce, Economic Growth, and Tourism Commission, P.O. Box 820, Trenton, NJ 08625 (tel. 800/VISITNJ; www.state.nj.us/travel). Also, there are 16 Travel and Welcome Centers throughout the state, located off the Garden State Parkway, the New Jersey Turnpike, and several other main routes. For a map of the centers, visit the Tourism Commission's website.

Getting There

By Plane -- New Jersey's largest airport is Newark Liberty International Airport (tel. 971/963-6000; www.newarkairport.com); it's only about 16 miles from midtown Manhattan and is Continental Airlines second-biggest hub in the country. There is also the Atlantic City International Airport in South Jersey (tel. 609/645-7895; http://www2.sjta.com/acairport/index.asp).

By Train -- Amtrak (tel. 800/872-7245; www.amtrak.com) has many train lines that run through the Garden State. The Acela Express runs between Boston and Washington, DC, making stops in Newark, Iselin, and Trenton, as does the Metroliner line, which runs between Washington, DC, and New York. The Carolinian/Piedmont line runs from New York to Charlotte, NC, making stops in Newark and Trenton, as do the Crescent line, which runs between New York and New Orleans, and the Cardinal/Hoosier State line, which runs between New York and Chicago. The Keystone line runs between Harrisburg and New York, making stops in Trenton, Princeton Junction, New Brunswick, Iselin, and Newark (both the airport and city stops). The Pennsylvanian line, which runs between New York and Pittsburgh, stops in Newark, Princeton Junction, and Trenton; and finally the Silver Service/Palmetto runs from New York to Miami, and makes stops in Newark and Trenton.

By Car -- At some point in their lives, everyone on the East Coast winds up on New Jersey's I-80, entering the state to the north from New York and exiting south into Pennsylvania. The Garden State Parkway runs from the state's southern shore point of Cape May north into New York and the New York State Thruway. The 44-mile Atlantic City Expressway connects the communities of south Jersey to the metropolitan Philadelphia, exiting into Pennsylvania.

Special Events

Fans of folk should check out the Bridgeton Folk Festival in June (tel. 856/451-9208; www.bridgetonfolkfestival.com), when folk heroes like Ani Defranco perform.

A spectacular setting for Fourth of July fireworks, filled with music, dinner, and dancing, is the Annual Battleship Blast aboard the USS N.J. (tel. 866/877-6262; www.battleshipnj.org) on the Delaware River. Launched 1 year after the Pearl Harbor attacks, U.S.S. NJ sailed its last mission in 1999, and is now a battleship museum.

The city of Trenton saw quite a bit of battle during the Revolutionary War. At the end of December, it celebrates its part in declaring independence during Patriots' Week (www.patriotsweek.com) with reenactments, theatrical performances, parades, art exhibits, and a slew of other Revolutionary-related activities.

Note: This information was accurate when it was published, but can change without notice. Please be sure to confirm all rates and details directly with the companies in question before planning your trip.