If you have a must-do list for Prince Edward Island, the experience of an Island-style lobster supper should be on it. Lobster suppers have a long history here, beginning several decades ago as community suppers. The opening of lobster season was celebrated in community halls, church basements, or even outdoors. Not only did it mark the arrival of spring (the ice having departed from the harbors and fishing grounds), it also brought welcome income. As is the way with Islanders, they began using these events to raise funds for worthy projects or to support the church.

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The logic behind the menu was simple. Local fishermen donated the lobster, farmers the potatoes and milk for chowder. Someone’s cold cellar would provide cabbage and carrots for coleslaw. Strawberries were the first fruit of the season. Biscuits, bread, pies, and squares came from local housewives, along with their own pickles. Everyone pitched in.

Soon word spread. Townfolk wanted to go, as did savvy tourists. New Glasgow Lobster Suppers opened their doors in 1958 when the Junior Farmers Organization held a fundraiser. Twelve Junior Farmers turned it into a business in 1972, building ever bigger halls to accommodate the crowds. Meals include unlimited chowder, mussels, lobster, bread, desserts, and beverages. This institution is important to the community, providing employment in a region where jobs can be scarce.
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These suppers still have the feel of the community events—informal, with lots of people chattering and having a good time. And the menu hasn’t changed: lobster is served at its best, fresh cooked, with a touch of the sea to keep it honest (hot or cold, your choice). The size of lobster you order will determine the price. Credit cards accepted. Expect to pay around C$40 each plus drinks. And the New Glasgow Lobster Supper is our top recommendation for this type of event meal.