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Forums » Germany » driving in Germany & Austria

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driving in Germany & Austria

by /bio/pdhenry »

AutoEurope offers a buy-back program via Peugeot.  Minimum period is 21 days.  There's a delivery fee as part of the lease cost that varies with distance from the Peugeot factory in France.

http://www.autoeurope.com/buyback_home.cfm

 

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RE: driving in Germany & Austria

by /bio/lojoblais »

Unfortunately, we will not be staying that long.  But I did find a company called gemut.com & was able to get reasonable rates from them.

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drobert360

RE: driving in Germany & Austria

by drobert360 »

Just be aware that a reservation for an automatic is not the same as a guarantee of obtaining a car with an automatic. Some locations and agencies are better at honoring their reservations. In other words, hope for the best. I relearned driving a manual transmission after unexpected getting one on an "automatic" car reservation (the origninal car was defective and they had no cars with automatic as back up). Most rentals in Europe largely rent manuals with a smaller number of automatics on hand.

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RE: driving in Germany & Austria

by /bio/monika »

We always rent from Gemuetlichkeit. A firm specializing in European  travel.

Check their Website at : www.Gemut.com    

They only rent cars  from known firms like. Avis.Hertz ( Sixt is an upcoming German firm)  and the like.

Please note. You might need an International Drivers license for driving in Austria !  Laws might have changed since I was there a few years ago

German Airports have a 20% surecharge, for rentals originated at the airport or train station.  Ask how you can avoid that.

Hope it helps.    Manfred

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drobert360

RE: driving in Germany & Austria

by drobert360 »

You will also need to purchase a road sticker when entering Austria (see website below) 

http://www.austria.info/us/plan-your-trip/driving-regulations-in-austria-1084578.html

You can obtain an International drivers permit ... Technically a translation of your US license ... At an Auto Club near you, you do not need to be a member as I recall (but do call first).

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RE: driving in Germany & Austria

by /bio/pdhenry »

You're right about that - see travel.state.gov. I knew about the toll vignette but didn't know about the driver's license. Luckily we were only barely in Austria (Reutte) and only for a couple of days a couple of weeks ago. 

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drobert360

RE: driving in Germany & Austria

by drobert360 »

The road stickers come in flavors ... most go with the cheapest which I recall is a 8 day version (under 10 euro). I usally buy it at a gas station at the border.

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kringenwally

RE: driving in Germany & Austria

by kringenwally »

Austria, the Czech Republic, Slovenia, and Switzerland have a road-tax sticker system. In Switzerland and in Austria the non-transferrable sticker is called Vignette. This website (click) sells them all, plus the Viacard that alleviates having to stop to pay tolls in Italy. 

Just so you don't get caught if you decide to make a sidetrip into Switzerland: The "Vignette" for Switzerland only comes in a 12-month version - other than sharing the same name with the Austrian one, there is no connection. So if you enter Switzerland in a vehicle that doesn't have the Swiss Vignette on display, make sure you stay away from the express routes where it is required - the ones signed in green.

You're legal on minor roads - this website (click) shows the map below in more detail. Those in red require the Vignette (click the map to enlarge).

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drobert360

RE: driving in Germany & Austria

by drobert360 »

Swiss vignette is expensive around $50 plus or minus as I recall so unless you must travel through Switzerland by car heed the cost.

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yostwl

RE: driving in Germany & Austria

by yostwl »

Just a couple of clarifications and confirmations:

You need the vignettes (window sticker permits) in Austria and Switzerland only if you are going to drive on the expressways.  We drove in Switzerland without having to get their expensive sticker as we never drove on their expressways.  And, yes, there is an under 10 euro sticker for Austrian expressways--it's good for 10 days.

Americans do get the International Driving Permit at AAA--you do NOT have to be a AAA member.  You need 2 passport size photos, though AAA can take the photos for you for an extra charge.  It usually takes me about 15 or 20 minutes to get the IDP.  You still must carry your regular driving license--the IDP is not a license itself, it is a document that translates your license into several languages.  Some countries (e.g., Italy and Austria) require it by law. 

It is unlikely that your car rental company will ask to see your IDP, but if you have an encounter with the police or an accident in a country requiring it, it's a legal violation not to have it.  And if you have an accident not having it means you're technically driving without a legal license and any insurance you have can be voided if your rental company or credit card company chooses to do so.

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