Arriving

By Plane -- Many people heading to Santa Fe choose to fly into the Albuquerque International Sunport, the state’s largest airport. This is especially worthwhile if you are also visiting Albuquerque. The Sunport is about 66 miles from Santa Fe, a straight shot via I-25. All major car rental companies operate out of Albuquerque Sunport; if you don’t want to drive yourself, Groome Transportation (www.groometransportation.com; tel. 505/474-5696) runs shuttles daily from the Sunport to Santa Fe and back again at a cost of $38 per person one-way. New Mexico Rail Runner Express (see below) also runs to Santa Fe, at a cost of $9 per person, with a free shuttle bus taking travelers from the airport to the train.

If you plan to skip Albuquerque, you can save time (but pay a bit more) by flying into the Santa Fe Regional Airport (SAF; www.santafenm.gov/airport; tel. 505/955-2900) just outside the southwestern city limits off Airport Road. The airport has non-stop service from Dallas/Fort Worth and Phoenix with American Airlines (www.aa.com; tel. 800/433-7300), plus non-stop service from Denver with United Airlines (www.united.com; tel. 800/864-8331). From the Santa Fe Municipal Airport, Roadrunner Shuttle (www.rideroadrunner.com; tel. 505/424-3367) takes visitors anywhere in Santa Fe and throughout most of northern New Mexico. A ride for one from the Santa Fe Airport to Santa Fe Plaza costs $60. Many Santa Fe hotels offer free shuttles from the airport.

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By Train -- Daily train service from Albuquerque to Santa Fe is provided by New Mexico Rail Runner Express (www.riometro.org; tel. 866/795-7245). Amtrak (www.amtrak.com; tel. 800/872-7245) has a daily east-west train, the Southwest Chief, running from Chicago to Los Angeles, which stops in Lamy, about 20 miles from Santa Fe. Roadrunner Shuttle (see above) provides transportation between downtown Santa Fe and the train station. Cost is $40 per person one-way; reservations are necessary.

By Car -- I-25 skims past Santa Fe’s southern city limits, connecting it along one continuous highway from Billings, Montana, to El Paso, Texas. I-40, the state’s major east–west highway, which bisects Albuquerque, affords coast-to-coast access. (From the west, motorists leave I-40 in Albuquerque and take I-25 north; from the east, travelers exit I-40 at Clines Corners and continue 52 miles to Santa Fe on US 285.) For those coming from the northwest, the most direct route is via Durango, Colorado, on US 160, entering Santa Fe on US 84.

Note: This information was accurate when it was published, but can change without notice. Please be sure to confirm all rates and details directly with the companies in question before planning your trip.