Traveling with young ones can be daunting, but Switzerland is by and large very family friendly. Kids and families are increasingly catered to with amazing playgrounds in the mountains, workshops at museums, and facilities at family-oriented hotels. Every season brings fairs and festivals. But that’s just the icing on the cake. A lot of Switzerland’s glory is outdoors, where kids and parents can have a good time doing the same activity, and kids can let off energy.

During urban explorations, too, you’re rarely far from somewhere to play. Some cities offer free scavenger-hunt-style games or urban golf. Many towns have drop-in family centers with playrooms and inexpensive coffee and snacks. Also, ask any parent you meet which cafes have a play corner—there’s usually at least one—and keep an eye out for the restaurants of supermarket chains Coop and Migros. They very often have a decent-sized play area as well as lower-priced food and kids meals in a casual setting (read: a little noise allowed). Those stores are also good bets for baby supplies and snacks.

A note of caution for children 2 years old and under: Some advice holds that they shouldn’t stay at very high elevations and that rapid ascents and descents can be uncomfortable. As on a plane, it’s good to help your little one swallow more with a drink or pacifier. You might want to check with your doctor if you plan to visit the mountains.

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On Swiss airlines, you must request a special menu for children at least 24 hours in advance. If baby food is required, however, bring your own and ask a flight attendant to warm it to the right temperature.

Arrange ahead of time for such necessities as a crib, bottle warmer, and a car seat (in Switzerland, car seats are legally required for children 7 or younger).

 

Note: This information was accurate when it was published, but can change without notice. Please be sure to confirm all rates and details directly with the companies in question before planning your trip.